WANG opposes valuing women based on how they look, rather than who they are and what they do. WANG also opposes the prohibitive and narrow beauty standards imposed on women that reflect racist, heteronormative, capitalist, sexist, ageist, cissexist and disableist ideologies.

Women everywhere are expected to conform: to remove their body hair, to wear make-up yet look ‘natural’. To diet, and to wear restrictive clothing. All in order to be considered acceptable, respectable and feminine. If you support women's choice to refuse these regulatory practices, then join WANG! It's not just for the unshaven and undeodorised but for anyone who believes that women should not be reduced to how they look, and that conventional beauty techniques aren't the only route to attractive and socially worthwhile people. People of any/no gender are welcome too, and we support all struggles against the pressure to conform to hegemonic representations.

This tumblr is no longer affiliated with WANG the facebook group.

 

lovethyfatness:

fatbodypolitics:

fatbodypolitics:

lovethyfatness:

Trust me— you need to click through and watch the trailer for this documentary. 

Watch the trailer! Donate and share!!

After last night and all of the hate being sent about this documentary it seems like the best time to support this film. Fuck the trolls.
Click here to find out what happened last night and report the account doing it.

Ultra sad this is happening. Though it highlights the necessity and importance of fat activism and projects like this documentary. If you’ve not yet contributed, don’t let this deter you— take it as a challenge, and lift a middle finger at the asshats trying to scare this project into not being funded.
(And for those of you who don’t know what doxing is: it’s making public the private [contact] information of targeted people with the intent to [incite others to] harass them.)
Ragen Chastain also wrote about this topic here.

lovethyfatness:

fatbodypolitics:

fatbodypolitics:

lovethyfatness:

Trust me— you need to click through and watch the trailer for this documentary.

Watch the trailer! Donate and share!!

After last night and all of the hate being sent about this documentary it seems like the best time to support this film. Fuck the trolls.

Click here to find out what happened last night and report the account doing it.

Ultra sad this is happening. Though it highlights the necessity and importance of fat activism and projects like this documentary. If you’ve not yet contributed, don’t let this deter you— take it as a challenge, and lift a middle finger at the asshats trying to scare this project into not being funded.

(And for those of you who don’t know what doxing is: it’s making public the private [contact] information of targeted people with the intent to [incite others to] harass them.)

Ragen Chastain also wrote about this topic here.

Anonymous asked
hi! i shaved my stomach when I was younger and now the hairs are dark. I used nair on it but there a little black/brown dots all over it. As they grew out a bit I tried to pluck them but the dots are still there. what should I do?

Hi Anon,

I’m not sure what you can do.

As a body acceptance blog I’m tempted to say that you could try and learn to accept them.

But if you don’t want to do that, or can’t, I’m not really sure what gets rid of black dot. If the black dots are the hair follicles maybe hair electrolysis is possible? Not sure if anyone has any other advice.

If the hair follicle is completely out, which is likely if you’ve plucked the hairs, then I don’t know what you could do other than cover them up e.g. with foundation….

ethiopienne:

CeCe McDonald, Reina Gossett, and Dean Spade: Police & prisons don’t keep us safe—we keep each other safe

pizzafemme:

embrace double chins and fat arms and double bellies and thunder thighs 2k14

Women are told it is unfeminine and gross to have muscles and to cultivate strength, which in turn leads them to actively avoid doing things that will build muscles and strength, which then makes them even less capable of doing things that require strength, which the critics then use as proof of women’s inherent physical frailty. And so the cycle continues…

Women’s difficulty with pull-ups is about more than biology | Fit and Feminist (via rememo)

And I always want to point out here: women, on average, possess more lower-body strength, while men, on average, possess more upper-body strength. There’s a lot of overlap and it isn’t always individually applicable, but that’s the generalization, averaging across the population.

But we SOCIALLY value upper-body strength, and upper-body muscles. So we construct women as weaker, because we refuse to measure them on the body parts where they may be stronger, we devalue those.

Lifting is mostly done with the legs. So women may be as good or better at heavy lifting as men. But we socially construct lifting as having to do with large, muscular arms and chests. You don’t really need powerful arms and chests to lift—you need powerful thighs, otherwise you’re gonna throw your back out. We actually lie about what makes a person strong and capable to favor men.

Push-up and pull-ups are upper-body strength exercises. So they’re socially valued. The military doesn’t tell you to do 20 squats as penance. No one is fucking impressed by all the squats you can do. Squats just sound stupid, hah, squats. We laugh at them because women might be better at them than men, on average. They’re worthless.

(via iknewiwouldregretthis)

This stuff plays into all sorts of other body image problems, too. The body weight that’s regarded as ideal for women, for example, is really only achievable for individuals suffering from mild to moderate muscular atrophy. You literally can’t get there just by shedding fat - you also have to let your muscles waste away. We actually regard it as “normal” for a woman to be suffering from muscular atrophy.

(via dancing-painted-bears)

I am always amazed that cis people can talk about this problem without once mentioning transmisogyny.
The most significant part of my transition, and the one that improved my ability to be read as cis the most, was losing two stone in muscle mass. I had to quit my job as a martial arts instructor and rein back my training hugely and it’s making me miserable, but cis people seem utterly incapable of not treating me like shit for having muscles.
And let’s be honest when have you ever heard a cis woman not follow up the phrase ‘I don’t want to put on too much muscle’ with ‘I don’t want to look manly/like a tr***y’?

(via terribaeddel-magpie)

(Source: brutereason)

huskerxdu:

I don’t know why I upload pictures in twos. Also black and white makes me feel artsy when I’m clearly not 😊

fatpeoplecatpeople:

pastelgorrorart:

messing around with some mermaid designs and came up with this lil cutie who I call Granatee, who is based off of a manatee in design so *jazz hands*

UM CUTE

fatpeoplecatpeople:

pastelgorrorart:

messing around with some mermaid designs and came up with this lil cutie who I call Granatee, who is based off of a manatee in design so *jazz hands*

UM CUTE

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Meg Allen

Butch

BUTCH is a documentary portrait project and exploration of the butch aesthetic, identity and presentation of female masculinity as it stands in 2013-14. It is a celebration of those who choose to exist and identify outside of the binary; who still get he’d and she’d differently throughout the day; who get called-out in bathrooms and eyed suspiciously at the airport; who have invented names for themselves as parents because “Mom” nor “Dad” feels quite right; and who will generally expect that stare from the gender police trying to figure out if they are “a boy or a girl”. It is an homage to the bull-daggers and female husbands before me, and to the young studs, gender queers, and bois who continue to bloom into the present.

 

the fact that “love your body” rhetoric shifts the responsibility for body acceptance over to the individual, and away from communities, institutions, and power, is also problematic. individuals who do not love their bodies, who find their bodies difficult to love, are seen as being part of the problem. the underlying assumption is that if we all loved our bodies just as they are, our fat-shaming, beauty-policing culture would be different. if we don’t love our bodies, we are, in effect, perpetuating normative (read: impossible) beauty standards. if we don’t love our individual bodies, we are at fault for collectively continuing the oppressive and misogynistic culture. if you don’t love your body, you’re not trying hard enough to love it. in this framework, your body is still the paramount focus, and one way or another, you’re failing. it’s too close to the usual body-shaming, self-policing crap, albeit with a few quasi-feminist twists, for comfort.

on “loving your body” (via silkchemise)

Pretty sure I’ve reblogged this before, but the sentiment still rings true. White supremacy makes me feel ugly as shit 99% of the time, and in the moments where I express my feelings of ugliness to feminist friends I am met with “why don’t you love yourself better?” “Omg you need a lots of self care” (which i dont always have the luxury of time/money for) and the worst of them, “Honey I think something’s really wrong with you, you need professional help :(“

Man, fuck that shit. The only “help” I need is good friends who want to help tear down the system with me. More often then not, however, my self-esteem dips and emotional responses to systemic oppressions usually result in my being told I’m not doing a good enough job of loving myself, instead of recognizing that we live in a world that makes it virtually impossible for marginalized (fat, brown, differently abled) folks to love our bodies in the first place.

(via tothedirigible)